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Sophie Monk brings own wind to red carpet

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Sophie Monk arrives at the 33rd Annual ARIA Music Awards at The Star in Sydney, Wednesday, November 27, 2019. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett) 

Australian music's night of nights may be peppered with big international acts but it was Bryon Bay local Tones And I who was the name on everyone's lips on the red carpet, one of many of the nation's home grown talent earning their recognition.

The 33rd ARIA awards kicked off in style on Wednesday with former Bachelorette Sophie Monk breezing quickly past reporters on the red carpet flanked by two assistants holding cordless airblowers, ensuring her signature blonde locks were perfectly windswept for photographs.

American performers Halsey and Khalid and English singer Dua Lipa walked the red carpet early to screams from waiting fans.

But Aussie singer Tones and I - nominated for the most awards this year - was the name on everyone's lips, breezing through the red carpet early dressed in fluoro green and fresh from a coveted US television appearance on Jimmy Fallon's Tonight Show.

"She's like number one all around the world," Aussie singer Dean Lewis proudly told AAP.

"It's insane."

Also arriving from the US was Newcastle local Morgan Evans, a country music star nominated for two ARIAs this year who flew home from Nashville on the heels of his world tour to perform at the awards night.

"I've been so busy the last couple of years travelling around the world playing and it's funny you realise that all you want is to be accepted where you come from," he told AAP.

"This is the award show I grew up watching and wanting to be a part of."

First-time nominee Baker Boy said he was excited to be up for three awards this year. The Darwin-born indigenous rapper - who he grew up watching Yothu Yindi and Jessica Mauboy - said the world was paying attention to Australian music's potential.

"People don't necessarily know what I'm rapping about because it's in my native language but people are paying attention," he told AAP.

"And you can feel the world is watching Aussie talent more and more."

The world may be watching, but so is idol Jessica Mauboy, who could still remember performing for Baker Boy when he was at school.

"Look where he is and all the work he did, it makes me proud," she told AAP.

"I don't think we realise as role models, or as just passionate music lovers, the impact we can have."

Pnau, who won the ARIA for best dance release last year, said despite the lack of live music venues, there was still plenty of Australian talent.

"There is a lot more people in Australia making music than when we first started," Pnau told AAP.

"I think access to technology had really helped as well as streaming services."

As always, the ARIAs delivered its share of wacky moments on the red carpet with Bob Irwin wearing a snake named Larry draped around his shoulders.

© AAP 2019